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How To Host An NRA Police Pistol Combat Tournament

Hosting a NRA Police Pistol Combat tournament is a simple process and can be done at nearly all shooting facilities. Tournaments can be large or small, can be conducted once a year, semi-annually, run every month or follow almost any schedule. Tournaments can be held at almost any range facility, such as at an agency range, law enforcement academy range, local gun club, or at a private or commercial range. Even an indoor range can be used for most tournaments.

The Application Process Is Fast And Simple.

Just complete a Tournament Application and submit it by e-mail, fax, or mail. Applications are usually processed in a matter of days, and you will be notified of the approval. Our staff will help you with the process, and can answer your questions. Just call us at 703-267-1632 or e-mail us at LEcompetitions@nrahq.org.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is a PPC Tournament?

A tournament is simply the name given to an event where law enforcement competitors participate in NRA Police Pistol Combat courses of fire and the event has been sanctioned by the NRA Law Enforcement Competitions Department. Tournaments may be a half-day in length for a small local Approved Tournament, or span multiple days for a large Registered Regional or Registered State Championship Tournament.

Why sanction my tournament?

Having your tournament sanctioned by the NRA lets competitors know that the event will be conducted under a uniform set of rules, what firearms and equipment is appropriate and that the scores they fire will be used for NRA Law Enforcement classification purposes when they are reported to the NRA.

What types of tournaments are there?

There are two basic Police Pistol Combat tournament types. They are Approved and Registered Tournaments. There are a few differences, but the main difference from a host's point of view is that Approved Tournaments do NOT need a turning target system and Registered Tournaments require a turning targets system. The other differences are listed below:

Approved Tournaments

  • Turning targets are NOT required
  • Scores are NOT eligible for National Records
  • Scores are NOT eligible for 1480 or 1490 Honorary Clubs

Registered Tournaments

  • Turning targets ARE required
  • Scores ARE eligible for National Records
  • Scores ARE eligible for 1480 or 1490 Honorary Clubs
  • Regional or State Championships must be Registered Tournaments

Who can be the hosting organization?

NRA sanctioned tournaments may be sponsored by any NRA Affiliated Club or Affiliated Law Enforcement Organization. While the tournaments may be run by volunteers from several agencies the Tournament Application must list the NRA Affiliation Number for the Affiliated Club or Organization.

Most NRA Affiliated Clubs will allow you to conduct your tournament under their affiliation. The range used does not have to be at the club site.

You can also elect to establish your group as its own NRA Affiliated Club. For information about doing this, contact NRA Clubs and Associations at 703-267-3939 or clubs@nrahq.org.

What kind of range and target system do I need?

Traditional police training and qualifications ranges are the most commonly-used ranges for Police Pistol Combat competitions. These are flat ranges with target frames that can hold a cardboard or paper NRA B-27 Target. You can use stands permanently mounted in the ground, or portable target stands. Many tournaments are held at civilian ranges, gun clubs, or commercial gun store ranges. Most of these groups are willing to help sponsor law enforcement officers by making their range available for your PPC Tournament. Some only ask for a small range fee to offset any cost they incur. This range fee can be included in the tournament registration fee you charge or listed as a separate fee the competitor pays.

Where can I buy targets?

There are many providers that carry the B-27 Target. When ordering, ensure that the targets you order are from an NRA Licensed Target Manufacturer and are Official NRA B-27 Targets. This will ensure that the targets comply with the PPC Rule Book, have been approved for tournament use and have the correct scoring dimensions so that competitors scoring is consistent and allow National Records to be set. Paper or cardboard B-27 Targets may be used.

Are turning targets required?

In Registered Tournaments, you must use a turning target system configured to face and edge the targets with the course of fire time limits. Non-turning fixed targets or turning targets can be used in Approved Tournaments.

What range distances are needed?

In order to fire all of the various PPC matches the range must allow 50 yard firing, have marked firing lines at 3 yards, 7 yards, 15 yards, 25 yards and 50 yards. It must also have standing barricade shooting positions for each target at 25 yards and 50 yards. However, a 25 yard range with marked firing lines at 3 yards, 7 yards, 15 yards and 25 yards with shooting barricades at 25 yards can be used for all of the matches except for what is known as the "Open Class 1500 Matches." These matches require 50 yards to fire.

Some tournament groups start off using a 25-yard range facility, since new shooters will probably not have the Open Class Revolver and Semi-Automatic Pistol gear, equipment, and match experience to fire the 1500 matches. With a 25-yard facility, you can fire the individual and team Stock Semi-Automatic and Service Revolver duty gun matches, and the Off Duty gun matches. These matches are great to draw new shooters to your tournament, since they can literally use their duty gear and do not have to but any equipment to fire in these matches.

How many people are needed to run a tournament?

Small tournaments can be coordinated by one person, the Match Director. The day of the match you will also need a Match Supervisor, who is not a competitor. The Match Director can also perform the duties of the Chief Range Officer and Statistical Officer, if they so desire. With the help of the competitors on match day all of the other activities can be handled. For a Registered Tournament you will not need the Match Supervisor. You will however need to have a 3-member jury selected (may consist of competitors) or have an Official NRA Referee on-site (assigned by NRA Headquarters). These members serve to decide on rule interpretations and monitor the match. NRA staff will gladly help you with understanding these assignments. The Police Pistol Combat Rule Book also clearly outlines each person's duties and responsibilities, and should be used as a guide as you decide the number of people you will need to assist you and make assignments.

What fees have to be paid to the NRA?

Each tournament host can charge the competitors any amount for their registration fee and associated club and range fees.

The NRA receives a Match Fee per competitor based on the matches fired.  This fee helps offset some of the costs needed to process scores, enter and maintain Classification data, print and mail Classification Cards, Regional Trophies, and other program costs such as the Honorary 1480 & 1490 Clubs, Distinguished Program, and Postal Match Team Program.

In Approved and Registered Tournaments, the NRA Match Fee is $2.50 for Duty Gun Division matches and $3.00 for Open Class Division Matches.  In Regional and State Championship Tournaments, the NRA Match Fee for Duty Gun Division Matches and Distinguished Matches is $ 3.00 and for Open Gun Division Matches it is $ 4.50. 

Reporting and making payment for NRA Match fees is done using the Tournament Fee Report after the tournament.

Where can I find the Rules for Police Pistol Combat Tournaments?

You can find the Police Pistol Combat rules by going to the online rule books. Make sure you also check for any rule book revisions by also looking online at the Rule Changes page.

Once your tournament has been sanctioned, you will automatically receive the other necessary forms for the type of tournament you have chosen to conduct. You will also need to fill out and return a SR-500 Police Pistol Combat Tournament Score Report for your competitors after each match. There are printed and PDF Form Fill versions, which can also be done electronically. If you have any questions, you can reach us at 703-267-1632 or LEcompetitions@nrahq.org.

Approved Tournaments

  • Tournament Poster, which must be posted on the Bulletin Board at your tournament. This form will have already been completed when you receive it.
  • Match Supervisor's Report
  • NRA Registration Fee and Match Entry Reporting Form

Registered Tournaments

  • Tournament Poster, which must be posted on the Bulletin Board at your tournament. This form will have already been completed when you receive it.
  • National Record Reporting Form
  • 1480 Club Reporting Form
  • 1490 Club Reporting Form
  • National Records Reporting Form
  • Official Registered Tournament Report

Registered Regional Tournament

  • Tournament Poster, which must be posted on the Bulletin Board at your tournament. This form will have already been completed when you receive it.
  • National Record Reporting Form
  • 1480 Club Reporting Form
  • 1490 Club Reporting Form
  • National Records Reporting Form
  • Official Registered Tournament Report
  • Regional Medallion Reporting Form

Registered State Championship Tournament

  • Tournament Poster, which must be posted on the Bulletin Board at your tournament. This form will have already been completed when you receive it.
  • National Record Reporting Form
  • 1480 Club Reporting Form
  • 1490 Club Reporting Form
  • National Records Reporting Form
  • Official Registered Tournament Report
  • NRA Police Pistol Combat State Team Postal Match Form

Want To Know More

For more information about the Law Enforcement Division, call us at (703) 267-1632 or email LEcompetitions@nrahq.org.

 

Law Enforcement Firearm Competitions

The NRA Law Enforcement Division offers a complete police shooting program to police departments and law enforcement agencies to encourage patrol officers to gain more experience, training and time on the range using their duty firearms.